tutorial

pdfDebug is an add on component that is available for iText 7. Its basic function is to allow a programmer to see inside of a PDF while it is being created. This allows for advanced debugging on programs that use iText to create or manipulate PDFs. Interested? Let’s take a look at how it works with an example. To start, we created a simple program whose goal is to create a pdf that has four pages, with one phrase on each page. Page 1: Hello World, Page 2: Hello People, Page 3: Hello Everyone. In addition, we want the headers Item 1, Item 2, or Item 3 depending on the page which it appears on...

Chapter 7: Handling events; setting viewer preferences and printer properties

Figure 7.1: Pages with different orientations
Figure 7.1: Pages with different orientations

We started with a chapter about fonts. In the chapters that followed, we discussed the default behavior of every element: Paragraph, Text, Image, and so on.

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Chapter 6: Creating actions, destinations, and bookmarks

When we discussed the Link building block in chapter 3, we created a URI action that opened a web page on IMDB when we clicked the text rendered by the Link object. We briefly mentioned that clickable areas are defined using Link annotations, and we referred to chapter 6 –this chapter– when we explained that createURI() created only one of many types of actions. In the examples that follow, we'll discover some more types, and we'll also learn about different types of destinations that can be used in a link.

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We announced iText 7 at the Great Indian Developer Summit in Bangalore on April 26, 2016. We released the first version of iText 7 in May. This tutorial is the first manual on how to use iText 7. It’s not the ultimate resource the way “iText in Action” was for iText2 and “iText in Action – Second Edition” for iText5. It’s called a Jump-Start Tutorial because it gives you a quick overview of the basic iText functionality, limited to PDF creation and manipulation. This allows new iText users to discover what’s possible, whereas seasoned iText users will spot what’s different...

Chapter 5: Adding AbstractElement objects (part 2)

Once we've finished this chapter, we'll have covered all of the basic building blocks available in iText 7. We've saved two of the most used building blocks for last: Table and Cell. These objects were designed to render content in a tabular form. Many developers use iText to convert the result set of a database query into a report in PDF. They create a Table of which every row corresponds with a database record, wrapping every field value in a Cell object.

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Chapter 4: Adding AbstractElement objects (part 1)

In previous chapters, we've already discussed five classes that implement the AbstractElement class. We've discussed the AreaBreak class in chapter 2, and we've discussed the four classes implementing the ILeafElementTab, Link, Text, and Image– in chapter 3. In this chapter, we'll start with a first series of AbstractElement implementations. We'll take a look at the Div class to group elements and at the LineSeparator to draw lines between elements.

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Chapter 3: Using ILeafElement implementations

The ElementPropertyContainer has three direct subclasses: Style, RootElement, and AbstractElement. We've briefly discussed Style at the end of chapter 1. We've discussed the RootElement subclasses Canvas and Document in the previous chapter. We'll deal with the AbstractElement class in the next three chapters:

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